Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Ployes

Ploye mix and finished product
As a kid, I remember Memere (pronounced mem-may), my  mother's mother who was French Canadian descent making ployes  at every meal for my grandfather. She made them on top of her wood fired cook stove.  They served as bread. My recent trip to  northern Maine, visiting my dad,  re-kindled this memory.  I made them  for dinner one evening to accompany a salad topped with roasted chicken. 

What are ployes?  Here's what wikipedia says:

"A ploye is a pancake type mix of buckwheat flour, wheat flour, baking powder and water which is extremely popular in the Madawaska region (New Brunswick), Canada and northern Maine, United States. The ploye was originally a simple carbohydrate filler food for the local population. It was very cheap, easy to make, and with local toppings, such as maple syrup or cretons, could vary in taste. This staple is often eaten with baked beans. Over time however it simply became a traditional dish."

Ploye Cooking in Skillet
The recipe is simple:  add 1 1/4 cups water to  1 cup of the  mix(buckwheat, wheat flower, baking powder and salt) and whisk to form a thin,  runny batter.   Pour about 1/2 cup into  a sizzling hot,  ungreased skillet ( a cast iron one works best). It cooks quickly so you have to stick close to the stove. When the edges are just dry, and bubbles have formed on the rest of the pancake, flip it over and finish cooking for a few seconds. It sort of resembles a crepe. The mix, sold in grocery stores in the area, definitely tastes just like the ployes my grandmother made.

My grandfather ate his ployes slathered with butter and rolled up.  Others use maple syrup (the real stuff is readily available in this part of the country).  We used butter and a little homemade maple syrup before rolling them up and enjoying. Either way, it's an interesting, high fiber, tasty,  regional dish that I'm proud to have as part of my heritage.

I brought some mix home to Idaho!

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.